Currently browsing Posts Tagged “cartoon”

Page 2 of 6

Sicko De Mayo

Posted by Mark in Mark's Sketchbook

Just drawing what I know, unfortunately. Sniffle.

 

Spontaneous Charley Stone

Posted by Mark in Mark's Sketchbook

I still have no idea what I plan to do with these characters, but for now they’re helping me practice. Today I practiced drawing characters moving dynamically, and worked on my digital inking technique.

Goof E by Goof M

Posted by Mark in Mark's Sketchbook

,

I really intended to be done with Disney characters, but I couldn’t resist this timely sketch challenge on Reddit. Also, for some reason I wanted to try out my dip pen again, and to my surprise I found it a little easier to handle. The one thing I did differently was make sure to doodle on a piece of scrap paper after each dip to get rid of excess ink.

I still need a good lesson in cross-hatching!

Quack is Wack

Posted by Mark in Mark's Sketchbook

,

I suppose you could have guessed who was next. My biggest mistake here was making his butt a bit too tall.

It’s amazing how complicated even the early Disney characters were. I think I’d have a stroke if I tried to draw The Beast.

Gawrsh Mark needs new eyes

Posted by Mark in Mark's Sketchbook

It’s about time I drew a goof besides myself. This time I approached it more like a Bargue drawing, measuring and correcting as I went (as you can see from all the half-erased lines). In fact, I think I’ll make these my replacement for Bargue drawings, since it gives you the same sort of practice (learning to see accurately), but you end up with a cartoon character instead of a boring piece of clip art.

 

Model Student

Posted by Mark in Mark's Sketchbook

,

I thought I’d take another crack at drawing characters from old animation model sheets, starting with the deceptively simple Mickey Mouse.

Overlaying my drawing (in green) over the model sheet shows my eyes still need some training.

Spring Slump

Posted by Mark in Mark's Sketchbook

,

Tons of sketches tonight, but none that I really wanted to share. But to keep up with my quota, here’s an example of me trying to inject some movement into a cartoon character.

Cartoon Characters are People Too!

Posted by Mark in Mark's Sketchbook

As I expected, the class got the joke and laughed politely, and then we discussed the drawing as if it were any other serious homework assignment. If only my harridan elementary school art teacher had allowed cartoons in art class, I’d probably have gotten all this schooling out of the way 30 years earlier!

Anyway, the teacher noticed something I already realized, which was that my character was way too stiff. Even after umpteen weeks of this class, and dozens of animation books imploring me to draw everything with a “line of action” in mind, I still have a tendency to want to turn every figure into a right angle. It’s a really hard habit to break.

So, I adjusted my figure a little, and re-inked it, digitally. Do you notice the improvement? Because there’s a smooth, imaginary arc from my back leg to my hand, it does a better job at implying movment, and the direction of that movement.

Really, I should be even more bent, but I didn’t want to reinvent the whole composition of the picture.

Of course, digital inking always looks a little flat compared to real ink, but I can always play with that in Photoshop:

Speaking of which, looks like a rainy day tomorrow, so I’ll sit in and finally finish Bob Hope!

How I Spent My “Spring Break”

Posted by Mark in Mark's Sketchbook

This week’s homework assignment was kind of a throwaway; another student suggested “let’s draw what we did with our time off,” and the teacher shrugged OK.

So for the purposes of this cartoon, I stood on a curb treating old ladies like figure models, even measuring with the bamboo skewer my teacher gives all her students as a tool.

This will either get big laughs, or the sound of intense, judgmental crickets. I’ll let you know!

Variable Bear

Posted by Mark in Mark's Sketchbook

The Paper software I mentioned yesterday got me thinking about how a brush-like, variable-width line might help my comic strip seem a little less flat. Sounds like I’m letting the computer dictate my style, but presumably this is about how I’d ink with a real brush. What do you think?